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Book: The Idea of a University
Author: John Henry Cardinal Newman
Longmans, Green and Co. New York, pp. 527


Excerpt from Preface:

When the Church founds a University, she is not cherishing talent, genius, or knowledge, for their own sake, but for the sake of her children, with a view to their spiritual welfare and their religious influence and usefulness, with the object of training them to fill their respective posts in life better, and of making them more intelligent, capable, active members of society.

Excerpt from Book: The Definition of a Gentleman

[A gentleman] is mainly occupied in merely removing the obstacles which hinder the free and unembarrassed action of those about him; . . . The true gentleman in like manner carefully avoids whatever may cause a jar or a jolt in the minds of those with whom he is cast; all clashing of opinion, or collision of feeling, all restraint, or suspicion, or gloom, or resentment; his great concern being to make every one at their ease and at home. He has his eyes on all his company; he is tender towards the bashful, gentle towards the distant, and merciful towards the absurd; he can recollect to whom he is speaking; he guards against unseasonable allusions, or topics which may irritate; he is seldom prominent in conversation, and is never wearisome. He makes light of favors while he does them, and seems to be receiving when he is conferring. He never speaks of himself except when compelled, never defends himself by a mere retort, he has no ears for slander or gossip, is scrupulous in imputing motives to those who interfere with him, and interprets everything for the best. He is never mean or little in his disputes, never takes unfair advantage, never mistakes personalities or sharp sayings for arguments, or insinuates evil which he dare not say out. From a longsighted prudence, he observes the maxim of the ancient sage, that we should ever conduct ourselves towards our enemy as if he were one day to be our friend.

Table of Contents:

1. Introduction

2. Theology A Branch of Knowledge

3. Bearing of Theology On Other Knowledge

4. Bearing of Other Knowledge On Theology

5. Knowledge Its Own End

6. Knowledge Viewed In Relation To Learning

7. Knowledge Viewed In Relation To Professional Skill

8. Knowledge Viewed In Relation To Religious Duty

9. Duties of The Church Towards Knowledge